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What You Need to Know About Caralluma Fimbriata


Article Source: Health And Fitness Journal

Caralluma fimbriata is a succulent plant, in the cactus family, that has been used as a natural appetite suppressant in India for centuries. It’s a new arrival in the family of cactii and succulent plants that are becoming increasingly popular for their appetite suppressant, and weight loss properties, as well as their ability to lower blood sugar. Supplements made from the popular hoodia gordonii cactus from the Kalahari Desert in Africa, are, for example, growing in popularity and usage in the U.S. and Europe. Like hoodia, caralluma fimbriata has been used to suppress appetite, and as a portable food for hunting. It is used to suppress hunger and appetite, and enhance endurance throughout India. It is also sometimes considered a “famine food,” used during periods of famine to suppress appetite. For centuries, people in rural areas of India have eaten Caralluma fimbriata, which grows wild over various parts of the country. Caralluma fimbriata is cooked as a vegetable, used in preserves like chutneys and pickles, or eaten raw. Caralluma fimbriata is believed to block the activity of several enzymes, which then blocks the formation of fat, forcing fat reserves to be burned. Caralluma fimbriata is also believed to have an effect on the appetite control mechanism of the brain. Ayurvedic (traditional Indian medicine) experts have noted that there are no adverse effects when using Caralluma fimbriata, and the plant has no known toxicity. A patented, tested extract of Caralluma fimbriata has been developed and standardized by a company called Gencor. Known as “Slimaluma,” the extract delivers the plant in a concentrated form. One of the only products available in the U.S. that uses the Slimaluma formula is Country Life’s GenaSlim supplement, which combines the patented Slimaluma extract of Caralluma fimbriata with EGCG (epigallocatechin gallate) from green tea. Together they reportedly have a synergistic effect on appetite control and weight loss. In several clinical trials Slimaluma was shown to be effective in reducing body fat through appetite control. If you’re interested in trying this product for weight control, you can compare prices now from various online vendors. SourcesKhan B, et. al. “Hypogylcemic activity of aqueous extract of some indigenous plants.” Pak J Pharm Sci., 2005 Jan;18(1):62-4. For more information visit: Our Store.

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Malaria ‘early warning’ test hope


Article Source: Health And Fitness Journal

Scientists hope new research may help cut the death toll from two of malaria’s most lethal forms.

Placental malaria and cerebral malaria kill hundreds of thousands of young children a year, with the cerebral form deadly in up to 40% of cases.

The Canadian researchers say they have have discovered a distinctive chemical signature for each type.

This gives the option of earlier, or more intense treatment in those who need it, they say.

"A test that helps detect placental malaria means women can be treated earlier in pregnancy"
Dr Kevin Kain
Study author

Billions of people worldwide are under threat from malaria, and the death toll from its various forms is thought to exceed a million a year.

Children can be vulnerable to the disease even before birth, if their mothers – particularly those expecting their first child – develop placental malaria during pregnancy. It causes the birth of underdeveloped or low birthweight babies and the threat of severe anaemia or death to the woman.

However, it was unclear exactly how the malaria parasite could cause these problems.

Specialists from Toronto’s McLaughlin-Rotman Centre for Global Health found the women with placental malaria carried a protein called C5a in their blood.

This appears to contribute to an excessive immune response, causing inflammation in the placenta and getting in the way of normal blood vessel growth.

This might well stop the baby getting enough nutrients during pregnancy.

Dr Kevin Kain, who led the research, said: “A test that helps detect placental malaria means women can be treated earlier in pregnancy, reducing the risk of death or or anaemia for them.”

Out of balance

Dr Kain was also involved in the second find, a combination of blood vessel-controlling proteins which indicate the presence of cerebral malaria.

In healthy children, angiopoietin-1 and angiopoietin-2 (ANG-1 and 2) are kept in strict balance, but in those with cerebral malaria, the balance disappears.

The bigger the imbalance, the more likely it was that the child would not survive.

The researchers said a test based on the chemicals would help doctors prioritise the sickest children.

Dr Delmiro Fernandez-Reyes, head of the division of parasitology at London’s National Institute for Medical Research, welcomed the research, presented at American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene meeting in New Orleans.

However, he said that their findings would need to be validated by other researchers.

He said: “What we are hoping for eventually will be a number of these biomarkers, which, together, will allow doctors to have a clear picture of what is happening in the patient.”

An using the biomarker to predict or identify cerebral malaria, he said, would not necessarily be practical, given the sudden onset of the disease.

“A child can be playing happily one day, and the next morning they are in the clinic with cerebral malaria,” he said.

He said that the find could offer insights towards new drugs to help fight the disease.

Easy treatment

Meanwhile, The Lancet medical journal has reported on a new way to make sure that children with malaria get the treatment they need quickly.

Normally, the only type of malaria medication available away from hospitals and clinics is pills, but children are often so ill that taking them is impossible.

A study looked at the success of a simple suppository version of the drugs, and found that it halved the risk of death or severe disability in patients with severe malaria, who were travelling from rural villages.

Professor Nick White of the Centre for Tropical Medicine, University of Oxford, who helped design the treatment, said: “If you’re several hours away from a clinic, it can be the difference between life and death.”

This article is from the BBC News website. © British Broadcasting Corporation

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‘Body clock gene’ diabetes clue


Article Source: Health And Fitness Journal

The workings of our internal body clock appear to be directly connected to our risk of diabetes, researchers claim.

International research published in the journal Nature Genetics found faults in a key ‘clock gene’ were linked to blood sugar levels and type II diabetes.

Some scientists already believe that our circadian rhythms (body clock) have a role to play in the condition, which affects millions worldwide.

But one expert said more evidence was needed, before a link was proved.

"Our research demonstrates that abnormalities in the circadian rhythm may partly be causing diabetes and high blood sugar levels – we hope it will ultimately provide new options for treating people"
Professor Philippe Froguel
Imperial College

Scientists say that unravelling the links between obesity, type II diabetes, and circadian rhythms could point the way towards new strategies to control or prevent the illness.

The fact that humans work on a rough 24-hour cycle, sleeping at night, and waking to be more active during the day, is controlled partly by hormones released by the body.

One, in particular, called melatonin, released by the pineal gland in the brain, is involved in drowsiness and the lowering of body temperature.

The researchers, from a variety of universities in the UK and abroad, scanned the genomes of thousands of people looking for associations between particular genetic variations and type II diabetes.

A team including scientists from Imperial College London found one genetic “variation” which appeared to be linked to a 20% increase in the risk of type II diabetes.

Another, including Oxford and Cambridge University scientists, discovered a second variation which could be linked to naturally higher blood sugar levels and diabetes risk.

However, it was the location of these variations on the human genome which suggested the connection to the internal body clock.

Both were connected to MTNR1B, a gene which helps control the action of melatonin on different parts of the body.

Bad sleepers

Professor Philippe Froguel, from Imperial College, said that the findings fitted with earlier research linking sleep problems with obesity, which increases the risk of type II diabetes.

“For example, we know that obese children tend to sleep badly and that people become more obese if they are not having enough sleep.

“Our research demonstrates that abnormalities in the circadian rhythm may partly be causing diabetes and high blood sugar levels – we hope it will ultimately provide new options for treating people.”

Professor Nick Wareham, the director of the MRC Epidemiology Unit in Cambridge, said: “This observation provides important clues about the possible mechanisms linking genes to diabetes risk.”

However, sleep and circadian rhythm researcher Dr Jim Horne from the Sleep Research Centre at Loughborough University said it was too early to be suggesting that problems with the body clock might actually be responsible for obesity and diabetes.

He said: “There are other explanations for the link between obesity and sleep disturbance – people who eat too much may have disturbed sleep, or be drowsy or sleep during the day, and obese people may suffer from sleep apnoea which can disturb sleep.

“The evidence linking insufficient sleep with these changes is very contentious, and we should be cautious about drawing the wrong conclusions.”

Separate research by researchers at Leeds University suggests that children with diabetes living in poorer households are less likely to have their blood sugar levels under control.

They looked at blood sugar levels in 1,742 Yorkshire children, mostly with the type I form of the disease, and found that fewer than 15% were reaching National Institute for Clinical Excellence targets.

Those from lower-income families were less likely to hit the target than those from more affluent families.

This article is from the BBC News website. © British Broadcasting Corporation

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